By

Amanda Krantz
In my first post in this IRB 101 series, I described what IRBs are and why they exist.  IRBs exist to protect research participants.  In this second post, I focus on risks to research participants.  What are risks to research participants? Risk is the probability that harm will occur.  All research involves some level of...
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Last week, I led an IRB 101 workshop for the Visitor Studies Association.  IRB is the acronym for Institutional Review Board.  That short three-letter acronym, IRB, can instill a lot of fear and anxiety in researchers and evaluators for multiple reasons.  For one, IRBs are an oversight organization, so non-compliance can have repercussions.  Additionally, the...
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Seven months ago, RK&A committed to anti-racist practice. To hold ourselves accountable, we write these updates to publicly document the work we have been doing and work still to do. We at RK&A, individually and collectively, pledge our commitment to being anti-racist—which we recognize as an ongoing pursuit through our everyday actions.   “Being racist...
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It has been three months since we pledged our commitment to anti-racist practices. We at RK&A, individually and collectively, pledge our commitment to being anti-racist—which we recognize as an ongoing pursuit through our everyday actions. To hold ourselves accountable, we want to document publicly the work we have been doing and work still to be...
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Last year, my colleagues and I chatted about the work of the International Council of Museums (ICOM) to propose a new definition of museums.  We listened to the MuseoPunks podcast, which featured different speakers talking about their perspectives on the definition process.  At the time, I remember being intrigued by the discussions.  The old definition...
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I started this blog about a month ago in frustration about the layoffs of museum educators (and other front-of-house staff although I am going to speak specifically about my experiences with museum educators).  I wrote it in a fury one night, and each day since my anger and sadness have grown as I have witnessed...
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Upon commencing a study that requires intercepting visitors on the museum floor, we are often asked by staff (sometimes nervously), “Will people say yes to participating in a survey, interview, etc.?”  Our answer is always yes, and we often state that you would be surprised how many agree to participate.  Generally about 65 to 80...
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Shortly after posting my last blog on social and emotional learning being imperative and in museum educators’ wheelhouse, some conversations with clients, colleagues, and research participants further drove this point home for me.  In my first post, I wrote about how important question-posing is for social and emotional learning and how museum educators are often...
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Just months ago (but what feels like an eternity ago), I was in an art museum observing museum educators lead a group of fifth-grade students on a museum visit.  One work of art they viewed highlighted inequities in the world by zooming in on areas where there is an abundance or absence of light across...
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A few weeks ago, we heard from Dr. Anthony Fauci: “You’ve got to understand that you don’t make the timeline, the virus makes the timeline.”  Fauci’s words ring ever-more true to me today than when he first spoke them.  Today marks the one-month anniversary of my daughter’s school closing, which has now extended through the...
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