By

Amanda Krantz
I wrote this blog post two weeks ago before coronavirus had changed our world so drastically.  Museums Advocacy is more essential now than ever.  Please consider how you can be an effective museum advocate, and see AAM’s resources here: https://www.aam-us.org/2020/03/19/urge-congress-to-support-museum-community-economic-relief/   “What are you doing here?”  This was the question that greeted me from a...
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The last week has been a wild ride for many of us in the United States and abroad.  A wrench was thrown into my normal (although never regular) schedule of museum visits, research design, and conference attendance.  All of a sudden, I became a substitute classroom teacher to a first grader, all the while practicing...
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With the new year in swing, I have jumped into professional development mode.  I was gifted a subscription to MasterClass and have been watching lessons on business leadership and strategy by Bob Iger, the CEO of Disney.  His advice and experience immediately resonated with me.  He relishes the solitude of morning hours to prepare for...
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Recently, I listened to the audiobook “Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men”—a must read/listen if you like data and are interested in UX design.  The author, Caroline Criado Perez, writes about a data gap that disadvantages women in many facets of their life.  One point that particularly grabbed me was the...
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Emily’s post inspired me to think about how I have also embraced some of the messiness of our work, but in another vein—the tension between evaluation and visitor experience. As an evaluator, I love order. Evaluation, by definition, is the systematic examination of the successes and shortcomings in the context of intended impact—systematic being critical...
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Before I visited Dublin this summer, EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum was not at all on my radar.  And, I must admit that the advertisement “fully digital museum” did not excite me, but I am so glad we gave it a chance because it turned out to be one of the most interesting parts of...
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Recently, I was invited to speak about quantitative data for The George Washington University’s course, Evaluating Museum Learning.  My task was not to teach students how to conduct quantitative analysis, but rather, to help students become knowledgeable interpreters of quantitative data—whether encountered in their future museum work or the daily newspaper.  Based on my experience ...
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