By

Amanda Krantz
When consulting statistician Margaret Menninger shared with us “How statistics lost their power – and why we should fear what comes next,” I read the article voraciously and immediately began sharing it.  I have always enjoyed numbers and the ability to use statistics to reveal patterns and trends.  However, I know that others are not...
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Sampling is a very important consideration for all types of data collection.  For audience research and summative evaluations in particular, it is important that the sample from which data is collected represents the actual population.  That is, the visitors who participate in a questionnaire or interview should match the entire population of visitors.  For instance,...
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Sample size is a standard question we are asked, particularly for questionnaires since we will be using statistical analyses. For most audience research projects, we recommend collecting 400 questionnaires.  We are not alone in this general rule of thumb—400 is considered by some researchers (and market researchers in particular) to be the “magic number” in...
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It has been a busy summer!  We are feeling a little bit like Carmen Sandiego with our small staff travelling all across the United States for work and fun but appearing very little on our blog.  Check out our travel map and see just what in the world we have been up to from Memorial...
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Data visualization is a very hot topic in the research and evaluation world right now. As a student of art history and art education, visual communication is something I believe in whole-heartedly and, like many evaluators, have been honing my skills in visual presentation. In reading about data viz, the tip “keep it simple” is...
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When I read Emily’s reflection on comfort zone at the end of December, my first feeling was that of understanding.   As a parent of a now almost 2-year-old, I could relate to her story. Parenting really did force me to explore my comfort zone, learning zone, and definitely that panic zone too—although I try to...
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Working in research and evaluation, you become very skeptical of words like “data-driven” and “research-based.” To evaluators, it is quite flattering that these words are so buzzworthy—yes, we want our research and evaluation work to be important, used, and even desired! However, even though these buzzwords grab attention, they can be misleading. For instance, when...
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A recent Telegraph article announced that the chairman of Arts Council England thinks there should be a one-hour photo ban (on selfies in particular) in art galleries. My first reaction was: “This is an interesting and absolutely horrible idea.” I see how a photo ban could be conceived as a strategy to enhance the visitor...
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Like me, you have probably seen dozens of friends and/or celebrities participating in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, may have participated yourself, or at least heard about it on the news. While the challenges have slowed since peaking about a week ago, they have reached broadly through my network. I was particularly surprised to see...
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One of the things I love about my job is the part where I need to find order in chaos, such as the trends in a large sample of individual in-depth interviews, and refining our processes for collecting and analyzing data in order to find that order more efficiently. I’d say that I have always...
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