INTENTIONAL MUSEUM BLOG

Sampling is a very important consideration for all types of data collection.  For audience research and summative evaluations in particular, it is important that the sample from which data is collected represents the actual population.  That is, the visitors who participate in a questionnaire or interview should match the entire population of visitors.  For instance,...
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Sample size is a standard question we are asked, particularly for questionnaires since we will be using statistical analyses. For most audience research projects, we recommend collecting 400 questionnaires.  We are not alone in this general rule of thumb—400 is considered by some researchers (and market researchers in particular) to be the “magic number” in...
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There is a reason behind every methodological decision we make as evaluators. While we give great thought to our evaluation design, our thinking is not always transparent.   We have decided to pull the curtain back on our thinking in a new blog series that we are calling “Evaluation Design: A Peek Behind the Scenes.” Our...
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Ever wonder what we do at RK&A or what it’s like being an evaluator? Cathy recently tackled those questions in a column for the Tufts Museum Studies alumni newsletter called “What’s My Job?,” where Museum Studies alums shed light on what its like to work in a wide range of careers in the cultural sector. Check out...
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Amanda: January came and went quickly.  At RK&A, we kicked off the year with a retreat.  Our main goal was to spend time together in one physical location–a rarity for our small office of seven.  We needed some bonding time… Thus, we participated in the personal response “tour.” My first experience with the “tour” was back...
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We may not have it all together, but together we have it all” Author unknown The Cycle of Intentional Practice is proving to be a very useful framework for planning (see “Cycle of Intentional Practice” for more information).  We have applied the Cycle to many different projects—from planning global initiatives, to developing action plans for individual...
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Last week I attended the MCN (Museum Computer Network) conference in Minneapolis.  It was an awesome experience—one that on the whole didn’t feel nearly as focused on technology as you might expect for a conference hosted by an organization with the word “computer” in its name.  Rather, the complexities of our relationships—with objects, spaces, and...
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On Wednesday, October 7th from 2-3pm EDT, RK&A’s Randi Korn, Amanda Krantz, and Cathy Sigmond will host RK&A’s second Twitter chat on thinking critically about outcomes, using the hashtag #RKAchat.  To join the conversation make sure your tweets include this hashtag.  Why this topic? Last week, Randi wrote a blog about the usefulness of outcomes in...
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When evaluators are called in to evaluate a program, exhibition, or museum, the first question they ask is, “Who is your primary audience?”  After fully addressing the “who” question, the next question is usually, “What are you hoping to achieve among [insert primary audience]?”  This question is code for “What are your intended outcomes?”  While...
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Yes, at first glance you might think that Yogi Berra and evaluation couldn’t be farther apart in ideology.  Not true.  By now everyone probably knows that Yogi Berra passed away last week at 90.  Most know Yogi because he was a great catcher, coach and manager for the game he loved.  My knowledge of and...
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