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evaluation
The case study below is from a project RK&A did with the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, IL and highlights the importance of iterative testing. — Future Energy Chicago Simulation [2013] An evaluation of a multimedia simulation for a science museum Between 2012 and 2013, RK&A conducted four rounds of formative evaluation of...
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The most challenging evaluation report I’ve written consisted of 17 PowerPoint slides. The slides didn’t pull the most salient findings from a larger report; the slides were the report! I remember how difficult it was to start out with the idea of writing less from qualitative data. While I had to present major trends, I...
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Emily’s last blog post (read it here) talked about when evaluation capacity building is the right choice.  When we think about building capacity for evaluation, we think about intentional practice.  This does not necessarily involve teaching people to conduct evaluation themselves, but helping people to ask the right questions and talk with the right people...
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As evaluators, we are often asked to help our clients build evaluation capacity among staff in their organization. The motivation for these requests varies. Sometimes the primary motivator is professional development; other times it is perceived cost savings (since conducting professional evaluations can require resources that not all organizations have at their disposal). We welcome...
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Today’s Throwback Thursday comes from deep in the RK&A vault – a study we did in 2002 for the National Museum of American History (NMAH) in Washington, DC. — For Which It Stands: The American Flag in American Life [2002] Study Context The National Museum of American History, Bering Center (NMAH) asked RK&A in 2002...
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For me, intentionality, a concept I view as essential to museum planning, emerged from two core experiences: results from hundreds of exhibition and program evaluations; and observing museum staff wanting to put too many concepts into an exhibition. Intuitively I knew there was a connection between exhibitions that didn’t fare too well (at least according...
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We have been thinking about intentional practice a lot lately.  The article below, written by Randi, appeared in ASTC Dimensions May/June 2008 issue.  If you would like to read more of Randi’s thoughts on intentional practice, be sure to read her 2007 Curator article, “The Case for Holistic Intentionality.” — At museum conferences these days,...
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I’ve always loved solving puzzles. And to me, people are the most fascinating puzzle of all. Perhaps that’s why I studied two people-focused topics as an undergraduate- biological anthropology and history. Not only was I curious to learn about how our evolutionary past has shaped human behavior, but I also wanted to understand how our...
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One of the things I love about my job is the part where I need to find order in chaos, such as the trends in a large sample of individual in-depth interviews, and refining our processes for collecting and analyzing data in order to find that order more efficiently. I’d say that I have always...
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You can’t escape technology in museums. Visitors use smartphones to take pictures. Exhibits use touch screens and high-tech interactives to share stories and information. Programs use technology to help visitors engage. Everywhere you look there is a screen . . . until you encounter an evaluator armed with a clipboard and a pencil. I don’t...
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