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intentional practice
I have long lobbied for museums to avoid using numbers as indicators of their success. I note in Intentional Practice for Museums: A Guide for Maximizing Impact that when museums boast their success with numbers, such as the number of annual exhibits and programs they offer, the dollars they add to their local economy, and...
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In recent years, self-care has emerged as a compelling idea among museum practitioners.  The sentiment is that, like so many in the not-for-profit world, museum workers are deeply passionate about the work they do and too often, they are overworked and feel underappreciated (and underpaid).  Burnout is high, and the need to take care of...
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Happy Valentine’s Day!  As many of you know, the idiom “Less is More” is attributed to minimalist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. I am grateful to him for coining the phrase and inspiring me to adopt it into my Intentional Practice.  Intentional Practice has two important guiding beliefs, both of which are hard to...
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This blog post holds a lot of meaning for me. Not only am I thinking about the 30th anniversary of RK&A and all of our accomplishments, I’m also reflecting on my time here as I prepare to move on to another institution (I’ll be working at the Detroit Institute of Arts!)  In other words, I’m...
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Communication complicates the best laid plans—that is what I have been pondering recently as I reflect on what I have learned in my 11 years working for RK&A.  Communication is pervasive in every aspect of our work, and in life.  It is both omnipresent and invisible, hovering somewhere in the background of every project, waiting...
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Last month I announced that 2019 marks RK&A’s 30-year anniversary, and I described the ways we have continually learned during that span of time.  I pointed out, that for me, the greatest learning happens from doing our work and promised that we would share some examples over the next 12 months.  I sat down to...
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2019 marks RK&A’s 30th anniversary.  Randi began the company in 1989 after working first as a designer and then as an evaluator, and seeing that all too often exhibitions were developed without visitors taken into account.  I joined RK&A 10 years later in 1999, after deciding I wanted to put my evaluation skills to work...
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Students are back in school and today we are pleased to feature a guest post from our consulting analyst Gemma Mangione. She offers insights into her teaching practice in the Arts Administration program at Columbia University. Evaluation factors into the Association of Arts Administration Educators’ graduate and undergraduate curriculum guidelines across an array of areas...
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At the start of this year, I started writing about the principles of intentional practice, and to date, I have shared three principles (#1, #2, and #3).  For this post, I feature the next two principles of intentional practice, and I present them together because they are both critically important for achieving the museum’s intended...
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Much of Intentional Practice work is about process, and a significant part of process work requires that we talk with each other.  I realize that humans exchange ideas verbally all the time, although given we live in the screen age (computers, phones, and pads), perhaps people are conversing face-to-face less and less.  And perhaps, as...
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